Khaplu Palace, Pakistan

Quaker Tapestry Volunteer Audrey Nunn shares her thoughts on being a virtual Clerk, organising Meeting for Worship during a pandemic and how Hereford Meeting have used this as an opportunity to travel the world together from their armchairs.

I wonder what it is like to be a real Clerk? I’ve only ever been a virtual one, taking over the task at the same time as Covid became worldwide. In some ways this offered a blank canvas. There surely had to be new and different ways to keep our Quaker community together? I realised immediately that Zooming could become an important tool in our community tool box, although it took our Friends a little longer to the appreciate its significance.

Of course, there were some Quakers who would have no truck with this modern sterile technology, but there were others, including a 90 something year old who welcomed the contact and meeting, albeit remotely.

We began Zoom Meeting for Worship very early in the pandemic

but with no opportunity to discuss the management of Zoom or the Meeting. Friends were given 15mins. to find their way into Zoom and this inevitably led to chatter as we helped people explore the array of symbols and their uses. Friends were also anxious to hear news of other Friends. We were certainly not entering the ‘room’ in the normal manner of Quakers. This led to what we termed ‘a forethought’ to draw us into the gathered silence. We were probably all surprised by the width of wisdom offered from a rich variety of sources by Friends. It was refreshing and enlightening.

Perhaps the seeking of guidance beyond the familiar, hinted at our struggle to understand a very different world and way of living.

Pacific Sunset, Rapa Nui
Pacific Sunset, Rapa Nui

Often Friends requested copies of the quotations and sometimes they were put into our ever-expanding newsletter. We ended our Meeting for Worship by sharing a photograph, which sometimes seemed to resonate with the forethought. Treasuring these wisdoms led to the idea of creating a booklet.

Photo by Vidar Nordli-Mathisen on Unsplash
Photo by Vidar Nordli-Mathisen on Unsplash

Since this time our Zoom Meetings for Worship have progressed along with the improvement of our Zoom skills. We now come into Meeting quietly acknowledging Friends as they join. There’s no longer a forethought and the length of the Meeting has increased. We have chat time at the end, but sadly no coffee.

We roamed the world with our chosen quotations and pictures, but returned to our Quaker roots and values to complete our work with a quotation from John Woolman (QFP 26.61). Complemented by the final panel from the Quaker Tapestry.

“There is a principle which is pure, placed in the human mind, which in different places and ages hath different names; it is however, pure and proceeds from God. It is deep and inward, confined to no forms of religion nor excluded from any where the heart stands in perfect sincerity. In whomsoever this takes root and grows, of what nation soever, they become brethren.”

John Woolman 1720-1772

Audrey Nunn, Hereford Meeting, January 2021

A Quaker Window onto Covid

Download the full PDF booklet which is full of gorgeous images and thoughtful text.

2 comments on “A Quaker Window onto Covid

  1. Barbara Stevens on

    What a superb idea.
    I have stewarded in Exeter cathedral for Quaker Tapestries, a lovely experience especially talking to visitors who knew little about Quakers and less about the history of the tapestries. At Come To Good Meeting we often use the post cards of some of the panels when giving talks to schools or groups.

    Reply
    • Bridget Guest on

      Hopefully talks to school groups will soon be possible once more. We remember the Exeter roadshow with fondness. The Come to Good meeting house on the Meeting Houses panel is a delightful building with a thatched roof.

      Reply

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“Brilliant, in many ways. I love embroidery, so thought this would just be interesting to see, but found it was incredibly informative not just about individual Quakers but how much they have done in our society.”

Well worth the entrance fee for the educational aspects alone!