Rochford Tapestry

Although the Quaker Tapestry was completed in 1996 it continues to inspire individuals and groups around the globe, ensuring the Quaker Tapestry’s techniques live on. So we were more than happy to advise the Rochford District Heritage Tapestry project, back in 2019. Now complete and preparing for their first public display, these 10 tapestry panels show a timeline of Rochford Districts history and change.

The project encouraged groups and individuals from all 14 parishes within Rochford District to create hand-crafted ‘tapestry’ panels, depicting significant events and local history over the last 1,000 years.

This has been a huge undertaking and the finished work measures over 10 metres long, in 10 separate panels. The scenes have been designed by local artists and historians, each based on a theme, specific events or people. More than 60 adults realised the drawings using a range of textile techniques, including embroidery, appliqué, knitting and felting. 80 local school children have also been involved with the felt work.

Each panel was designed to be displayed both individually and collectively with the others. There are overlaps in dates across the panels but no gaps.

Read more about the project

See for free!

All 10 framed panels, together with fabulous knitted items, accompanying drawings, historical information and children’s activities will be on public display at Ashingdon Elim church from Tuesday 27th July to Saturday 7th August 2021. This exhibition is ticketed and can be booked online

Feeling inspired?

A visit to see the Quaker Tapestry prompts many to think about what story they would tell in stitch. So although the Quaker Tapestry was completed in 1996 ‘inspired by’ panels, completed by individuals and groups around the globe, ensure the Quaker Tapestry’s techniques live on. We have other blogs about inspired by projects and on how to produce and frame your own tapestry project.

For more information and advice on the techniques used please see our Embroidery DVD and Stitch Guide book

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“An extraordinary history starting in the Lake District in 1652, founding banks, chocolate companies, building railways, establishing Pennsylvania, chatting with Russian Czars and Turkish Sultans.”

Who would have thought Quakers would be so interesting!