White poppies needed

Knitted or crocheted white poppies needed to be part of a display at Kendals Wool Gathering.

Quaker Tapestry are hoping to have some white poppies in this display.

White poppies recall all victims of all wars, including victims of wars that are still being fought. This includes people of all nationalities. It includes both civilians and members of armed forces. All those killed in war, all those wounded in body or mind, the millions who have been made sick or homeless by war and the families and communities torn apart. Today, over 90% of people killed in warfare are civilians.  Working for peace is the natural consequence of remembering the victims of war. You can read more in our blog White Poppies – Remembering all victims of war

To help get our appeal we have included knitting and crochet patterns (below) in the hopes to inspire you to contributing some.

Finished white poppies should be brought to Quaker Tapestry no later than mid day on 28th October 2017.

Please share this blog if you know of other knitters!

Round Rib or Knit Poppy Pattern

(Pattern and image sourced from hippystitch blog )

These patterns are designed with double knitting yarn in mind and needle size 3.25mm (imperial size 10) or 3.75mm (imperial size 9).  If you have different yarn that’s OK  – just use what you have with the right size needles for the yarn you’re using (slightly smaller needles are better).

Pattern

Main part of the poppy:
Cast on 54 stitches
Row 1: Knit 2, Purl 2 across the row (ending with Knit 2)
Row 2: Purl 2, Knit 2 across the row (ending with Purl 2)
Rows 3-8: Repeat rows 1 & 2, 3 more times
Row 9: Knit 2 together across the row (27 stitches)
Rows 10: Knit 3 together across the row (9 stitches)

Leave a long tail and thread through the remaining 9 stitches.  Pull tight into a circle and secure. Stitch the 2 edges neatly together to complete the main part of your poppy.

If you don’t like purl stitch or don’t know how to do it you can just complete this pattern all in knit (see top poppy in picture)

Poppy Centre:

There are three options for this

Option One: 
Cast on 20 stitches
Rows 1-2: Knit
Row 3: Knit 2 together across the row (10 stitches)
Rows 4-5: Knit
Row 6: Knit 2 together across the row (5 stitches)

Leave a long tail and thread through the remaining stitches.  Pull tight into a circle and secure. Stitch the 2 edges neatly together and stitch into the centre of your poppy.

Option Two:
Cast on 18 stitches
Knit a row
Leave a long tail and thread through the remaining stitches.  Pull tight into a circle and secure. Stitch the 2 edges neatly together and stitch into the centre of your poppy.

You can use any black yarn but eyelash yarn makes a nice fluffy centre.  (See white rib poppy in main picture)

Option Three:
Sew a black button in the centre of your poppy

Crocheted Poppies

(Pattern sourced from BBC Radio Nottingham website)

Pattern one. Three petal crochet poppy with 4.5mm hook

Ch 3, join with slst to form circle. Ch 3, work 9 dc into the centre of the circle and join with slst.

Work the three petals separately.

Petal 1.
Ch 3, work 1st dc into same st, work 2 dc into each of the next 3 sts. Ch 1 work 2 sc into each st, tie off.

Petal 2.
Work 2 dc into last dc of previous petal, work 2 dc into each of the next 3 sts. Ch 1 work 2 sc into each st, tie off.

Work petal 3 as 2.

Sew all ends in and attach button in the centre. Add pin

Pattern two. Two petal crochet poppy with 3mm hook

Rnd 1: ch2. Make 10dc in 2nd ch from hook. Join with a slst in 1st dc. (10sts)

Rnd 2: *ch1 dc ch1 2tr in next st, 3tr in next st, 2tr ch1 dc in next st, slst in next 2sts. rep from * once again.

Rnd 3: *ch1 3dc in next 2 sts, 2dc in next 5sts, 3dc in next 2 sts,slst in next 2sts. rep from * once again. Fasten off. Attach button in the centre. Add pin.

Stitch explanation st(s) = stitch (es) ch = chain rep=repeat dc = double crochet rnd=round htr = half treble crochet slst = slip stitch r = row tr = treble crochet

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